Humanities Indicators
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Workforce  >  Postsecondary Humanities Faculty
 
Faculty Job Satisfaction

The level of job satisfaction of humanities faculty serves as another valuable indicator of the state of the profession, and the most recent data available reveal satisfaction levels of humanities faculty that are close to the average for all faculty.

Findings and Trends

  • In 2004, just over 45% of all humanities faculty described themselves as being “very satisfied” with their jobs (Indicator III-15a), up 10 percentage points from 1988. Especially from 1999 to 2004, this trend toward greater satisfaction occurred across all academic fields, and in 2004 faculty in most fields reported satisfaction levels similar to those in the humanities. The only exceptions were the business and education faculties, with “very satisfied” rates of 52% and 56%.
  • From 1988 to 2004, workload was the aspect of their employment with which humanities faculty were most satisfied, with the percentage of those reporting being “very satisfied” reaching 40% in 2004 (Indicator III-15b).
  • The aspect of their jobs with which humanities faculty were least satisfied was pay, with only 21% of faculty describing themselves as being “very satisfied” with their earnings in 2004. This is, however, an improvement over 1993, when humanities faculty satisfaction with salaries dipped to 13%, but pay did remain a concern for the majority of humanities faculty throughout the period.
  • Satisfaction with benefits decreased over the course of the 1990s but rebounded in 2004, rising seven percentage points to 27%. The percentage of those reporting that they were very satisfied with the opportunity for advancement was similar, although the most recent data available on this element of job satisfaction are from 1999 because the question was not asked as part of the 2004 round of the survey from which these data are drawn.
III-15a: Percentage of Postsecondary Faculty Who Were “Very Satisfied” with Their Jobs Overall, by Primary Teaching Field, 1988–2004
Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (2004); data accessed and analyzed via NCES’s online Data Analysis System at http://nces.ed.gov/das/.
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III-15b: Percentage of Postsecondary Humanities Faculty Who Were “Very Satisfied” with Selected Aspects of Their Jobs, 1988–2004

*The National Center for Education Statistics did not collect data on faculty satisfaction with advancement opportunities in 2004.

Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (2004); data accessed and analyzed via NCES’s online Data Analysis System at http://nces.ed.gov/das/.

About this DataRelated Indicators
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